Medical Acupuncture

Randomized clinical trial of five ear acupuncture points for the treatment of overweight people

acupmed-2014-April-32-2-132-F2.large.jpg

Abstract

Objective To evaluate the efficacy of the five ear acupuncture points (Shen-men, Spleen, Stomach, Hunger, Endocrine), generally used in Korean clinics for treating obesity, and compare them with the Hunger acupuncture point.

Methods A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in 91 Koreans (16 male and 75 female, body mass index (BMI)≥23), who had not received any other weight control treatment within the past 6 months. Subjects were divided randomly into treatment I, treatment II or sham control groups and received unilateral auricular acupuncture with indwelling needles replaced weekly for 8 weeks. Treatment I group received acupuncture at the five ear acupuncture points, treatment II group at the Hunger acupuncture point only and the sham control group received acupuncture at the five ear acupuncture points used in treatment I, but the needles were removed immediately after insertion. BMI, waist circumference, weight, body fat mass (BFM), percentage body fat and blood pressure were measured at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks after treatment.

Results For the 58 participants who provided data at 8 weeks, significant differences in BMI, weight and BFM were found between the treatment and control groups. Treatment groups I and II showed 6.1% and 5.7% reduction in BMI, respectively (p<0.004). There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups.

Conclusions This finding suggests that the five ear acupuncture points, generally used in Korean clinics, and the Hunger point alone treatment are both effective for treating overweight people.

https://aim.bmj.com/content/32/2/132.long

https://www.kmcric.com/database/ebm_result_detail?cat=RCT&access=R201312045

 

Advertisements
Standard
Medical Acupuncture

Neurophysiological Basis of Acupuncture-induced Analgesia—An Updated Review

This article presents an up-to-date review of the various neurophysiologic mechanisms that have been proposed to produce acupuncture-induced analgesia.

Figure 4. Schematic diagram of the best explanation of the physiologic basis of acupuncture-induced analgesia.

Blue arrows = activation; red arrows = inhibition. 5-HT = 5-hydroxytryptamine; DNIC = diffuse noxious inhibitory control; LTD = long-term depression; LTP = long-term potentiation.

 

Neurophysiological Basis of Acupuncture-induced Analgesia—An Updated Review

Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies

Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2012, Pages 261-270

 

Standard
Medical Acupuncture

Critical roles of TRPV2 channels, histamine H1 and adenosine A1 receptors in the initiation of acupoint signals for acupuncture analgesia

The mast cell is the central structure of acupoints and is activated by acupuncture through TRPV2 channels. The mast cell transduces the mechanical stimuli to acupuncture signal by activating either H1 or A1 receptors, therefore triggering the acupuncture effect in the subject.

Figure 3

Critical roles of TRPV2 channels, histamine H1 and adenosine A1 receptors in the initiation of acupoint signals for acupuncture analgesia

Scientific Reports, volume 8, Article number: 6523 (2018)

Standard
Medical Acupuncture

Electroacupuncture for Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

The participants in the EA group received EA treatment with a mixed current of 2 Hz/120 Hz at 12 acupuncture points (bilateral Zusanli [ST36], Xuanzhong [GB39], Yinlingquan [SP9], Sanyinjiao [SP6], Taichong [LR3], and Zulinqi [GB41]) twice per week for 8 weeks. Depending on the sites of pain, the additional acupuncture point Bafeng (EX-LE10) was available.

Electroacupuncture for Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy A Multicenter Randomized Assessor Blinded Controlled Trial

To our knowledge, this is the first multicenter randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of EA treatment for the management in PDN. One limitation is that neither a placebo nor sham EA was used as an active control; therefore, the possibility of a placebo effect was not excluded. In conclusion, the results of this study
demonstrate that EA treatment is effective for reducing pain and improving sleep disturbance and quality of life in PDN. In addition, EA treatment was well tolerated and safe during this study. These findings suggest that EA treatment may be recommended as a nonpharmacological treatment for pain reduction in PDN.

Standard
Integrative Cancer Care, Medical Acupuncture

Acupuncture as a Therapeutic Treatment for Cancer Pain

ACUPUNCTURE FOR CANCER PAIN: THE CLINICAL EVIDENCE

A Comparative Literature Review in 2017 found a potentially positive effect of acupuncture in treating cancer pain.3 The review included two systematic reviews, the older of which was unable to draw firm conclusions due to small sample sizes and clinical differences in the patients being treated. The more recent review included 36 trials and over 2200 randomised patients. They found a moderate effect size of acupuncture on cancer-related pain, and concluded that “acupuncture is effective in relieving cancer-related pain, particularly malignancy-related and surgery-induced pain.”4

Although this review did not report on risks arising from treatment with acupuncture, elsewhere studies have indicated that acupuncture is a feasible and safe treatment56 and may successfully be used to treat cancer patients for symptom management due to the low risks associated with its use.7

HOW ACUPUNCTURE TREATS CANCER PAIN: BIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS

Acupuncture’s mechanisms for treating cancer pain are thought to be similar to those for treating other painful conditions, whether the pain is categorised as acute or chronic.

These mechanisms have been researched extensively for over 60 years, and while there is still much left to learn about acupuncture mechanisms and the human body in general, the neural pathways from acupuncture point stimulation to the spinal cord and then to the deactivation of the pain centres in the brain have been mapped.89Acupuncture has been demonstrated to activate a number of the body’s own opioids as well as improve the brain’s sensitivity to opioids.10 A number of other biochemicals involved in pain reduction have been found to be released and regulated by acupuncture stimulation, including ATP, adenosine, GABA and substance P.11 Acupuncture has also been demonstrated to reduce activity in the parts of the brain associated with the perception of pain and increase activity in brain areas associated with improved self-regulation.12

 

Read more ->

Acupuncture as a Therapeutic Treatment for Cancer Pain

Mairi Caughey, BSc and Mel Hopper Koppelman, DAc, MSc, MSc

Standard
Herbal Medicines, Integrative Cancer Care

Efficacy and Safety of the Traditional Herbal Medicine, Gamiguibi-tang, in Patients With Cancer-Related Sleep Disturbance

Efficacy and Safety of the Traditional Herbal Medicine, Gamiguibi-tang, in Patients With Cancer-Related Sleep Disturbance: A Prospective, Randomized, Wait-List-Controlled, Pilot Study

Image result for 가미귀비탕

Figure

Figure 2. Changes in the ISI (A) and BFI (B) scores in the GGBT and wait-list groups. The ends of whiskers represent the upper and lower limit of the values and columns represent 25th and 75th percentile with the median value. The connecting lines represent changes of mean values. *Represents change that was statistically significant (P < .05). White columns represent GGBT group, whereas gray columns represent wait-list group. ISI, Insomnia Severity Index; BFI, Brief Fatigue Inventory; GGBT, Gamiguibi-tang.

 

This study showed that GGBT significantly improved sleep quality and fatigue level but not depression and cognitive impairment in patients with cancer after 2 weeks of intervention without serious adverse events.

Patients with cancer have difficulty maintaining good sleep quality because of their psychosocial and physical stresses. However, standard nonpharmacological and pharmacological approaches to alleviate sleep disturbance in patients with cancer are still lacking. The duration and depth of sleep in these patients is affected by physical problems such as respiratory failure or pain, stressful decisions about cancer therapies and therapy-induced adverse events, as well as circadian disturbance caused by the cancer itself.7,24 In addition, sleep insufficiency arouses immunosuppression and increases the incidence of cardiac, metabolic, and inflammatory diseases.25,26 However, cognitive behavior therapy—one of the nonpharmacological approaches and the current standard recommendation—requires sufficient amount of time and workforce to administer. The possibilities of impaired liver or renal function due to chemotherapies or cancer-related issues call for safer pharmacological approaches for patients with cancer and survivors of cancer.

 

Standard
Herbal Medicines, Integrative Cancer Care

Kamikihito improves cancer-related fatigue by restoring balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems

Kamikihito improves cancer-related fatigue by restoring balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems

An external file that holds a picture, illustration, etc.
Object name is gr3.jpg

CONCLUSIONS:

Fatigue was more serious in patients with cancer than in control patients. Kamikihito rescued this fatigue and improved anxiety and sleepiness. It restored autonomic nervous system balance and antioxidant function.

Standard